MEGADELUXE
FOR THE LOVE OF SPEED, SPORT & DESIGN
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habermannandsons:

The Tarf-Gilera (also known as the Italcorsa) was built in 1948 by the Italian driver and engineer Piero Taruffi. The unique machine sprang from Taruffi’s desire to build a car that embodied the features of a motorcycle, and its novel twin-pod layout carried its 500-cc, 120-degree V-Twin Guzzi engine and chain drive in the right pod, with the driver and fuel tank occupying the left one. The 50-hp engine breathed through an air intake in the nose of its pod, and all components were enclosed by beautifully crafted aluminum bodywork. It became the “Fastest 500 in the World” that November, traversing the flying kilometer at an average speed of just under 130 mph, one of six records it set that day.
habermannandsons:

The Tarf-Gilera (also known as the Italcorsa) was built in 1948 by the Italian driver and engineer Piero Taruffi. The unique machine sprang from Taruffi’s desire to build a car that embodied the features of a motorcycle, and its novel twin-pod layout carried its 500-cc, 120-degree V-Twin Guzzi engine and chain drive in the right pod, with the driver and fuel tank occupying the left one. The 50-hp engine breathed through an air intake in the nose of its pod, and all components were enclosed by beautifully crafted aluminum bodywork. It became the “Fastest 500 in the World” that November, traversing the flying kilometer at an average speed of just under 130 mph, one of six records it set that day.
habermannandsons:

The Tarf-Gilera (also known as the Italcorsa) was built in 1948 by the Italian driver and engineer Piero Taruffi. The unique machine sprang from Taruffi’s desire to build a car that embodied the features of a motorcycle, and its novel twin-pod layout carried its 500-cc, 120-degree V-Twin Guzzi engine and chain drive in the right pod, with the driver and fuel tank occupying the left one. The 50-hp engine breathed through an air intake in the nose of its pod, and all components were enclosed by beautifully crafted aluminum bodywork. It became the “Fastest 500 in the World” that November, traversing the flying kilometer at an average speed of just under 130 mph, one of six records it set that day.
habermannandsons:

The Tarf-Gilera (also known as the Italcorsa) was built in 1948 by the Italian driver and engineer Piero Taruffi. The unique machine sprang from Taruffi’s desire to build a car that embodied the features of a motorcycle, and its novel twin-pod layout carried its 500-cc, 120-degree V-Twin Guzzi engine and chain drive in the right pod, with the driver and fuel tank occupying the left one. The 50-hp engine breathed through an air intake in the nose of its pod, and all components were enclosed by beautifully crafted aluminum bodywork. It became the “Fastest 500 in the World” that November, traversing the flying kilometer at an average speed of just under 130 mph, one of six records it set that day.
habermannandsons:

The Tarf-Gilera (also known as the Italcorsa) was built in 1948 by the Italian driver and engineer Piero Taruffi. The unique machine sprang from Taruffi’s desire to build a car that embodied the features of a motorcycle, and its novel twin-pod layout carried its 500-cc, 120-degree V-Twin Guzzi engine and chain drive in the right pod, with the driver and fuel tank occupying the left one. The 50-hp engine breathed through an air intake in the nose of its pod, and all components were enclosed by beautifully crafted aluminum bodywork. It became the “Fastest 500 in the World” that November, traversing the flying kilometer at an average speed of just under 130 mph, one of six records it set that day.
habermannandsons:

The Tarf-Gilera (also known as the Italcorsa) was built in 1948 by the Italian driver and engineer Piero Taruffi. The unique machine sprang from Taruffi’s desire to build a car that embodied the features of a motorcycle, and its novel twin-pod layout carried its 500-cc, 120-degree V-Twin Guzzi engine and chain drive in the right pod, with the driver and fuel tank occupying the left one. The 50-hp engine breathed through an air intake in the nose of its pod, and all components were enclosed by beautifully crafted aluminum bodywork. It became the “Fastest 500 in the World” that November, traversing the flying kilometer at an average speed of just under 130 mph, one of six records it set that day.
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bassman5911:

Arthur Rothstein
Dust Storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma (1936)
(via Charles A. Hartman Fine Art | Artsy)
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lonestar-state-of-mind:

Farm in Dalhart Texas, 1938.
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mpdrolet:

Longmont, Colorado, 1973
Robert Adams
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dbslrt:

Carroll Shelby in an Aston Martin DBR1, 1959 Tourist Trophy, Goodwood.
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humanoidhistory:

Evel Knievel jumps over buses, October 25, 1975. Photo by Tom Hubbard.
(Rachel Richardson/Flickr)
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desertmotors:

1967 Toyota 2000GT
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universeofchaos:

Words
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archaictires:

1955 Jaguar D-Type
archaictires:

1955 Jaguar D-Type
archaictires:

1955 Jaguar D-Type
archaictires:

1955 Jaguar D-Type
archaictires:

1955 Jaguar D-Type